His Mercy

"His Mercies Are New Every Morning"

A Thought

In this life we can not always do great things. But we can do small things with great love.." :) Mother Teresa

Prayer Quote

“I pray because I can't help myself. I pray because I'm helpless. I pray because the need flows out of me all the time- waking and sleeping. It doesn't change God- it changes me.”
― C. S. Lewis

Faith

I believe in the sun even when it's not shining. I believe in love even when I don't feel it. And I believe in God even when He is silent. (quote found on the wall of a concentration camp)

Weather Underground

Click for Wylie, Texas Forecast

NEW WEB SITE

Check Out Our Other Web Site!
Posts are being added Daily......

www.parentingthatheals.org

Thursday, August 9, 2012

Jumping and Overcoming

I took the girls to Gymnastics free play yesterday.  It is usually a smaller group for the home school association, but being summer, it was MUCH larger.  In fact, there were about 50 children participating.  When we walked in I heard Sarah groan.... "Oh great, I'm going to get asked a bunch of questions."   I just hurt for her sometimes. 
Alli offered, "I'll take care of them!"  Um. No Alli, that won't be necessary. LOL 

There were a few of those "mean girl" types gawking with mouths hanging open like Sarah was some sort of freak of nature.  She politely asked them to stop staring when it got out of hand.
That daycare group left and then things were much better for her.... On the way home, Sarah said, "Mom, did you know that there is something wrong with every single one of my limbs?"  "EVERY ONE!"   We all got a bit of a chuckle out of that. :)

Yes, Sarah, but look at all you do!  She has been on crutches for a last few weeks off and on due to pain issues.  She stayed on crutches for a couple of days before the gynmastics event so she could jump.  And boy can she jump! :)

I sure do wish some of these children's parents would teach them about differences.  Honestly, to open your mouth and say OMG is so far out of line, I don't know how to express it..... it is off the chart inappropriate, but we see it ALL THE TIME!  
Sarah is a sweet girl. She is kind and funny and talented.  I HATE it that she has to go through such scrutiny.  I LOVE IT that she NEVER gives up! :) That's my girl!


7 comments:

Brooke said...

We are reading through a book called "Prudence and the Millers" at morning devotions. The story this morning was about accepting children with differences. We discussed it this morning, and then I read them your post this afternoon. They couldn't believe anyone would be rude to Sarah, and they were very impressed with her jumping.

Annie said...

I try to be understanding when children stare or ask questions - there are SO many differences that have to be covered, and so many things you want to teach little children....and USUALLY we do teach them to look to find out, and to ask questions! But, when you get right down to it - even if children experience something that is VERY different to what they are used to, I can't understand why they haven't picked up a delicacy and sensitivity that would prevent the worst rudeness. (Though there are people who have social disabilities, too, for that matter - it is often a part of Aspergers, I know.)

We always wonder (well, I do) whether to help someone, or not (I've had people in wheelchairs snap at me for holding a door for them - when I would have held the door for anyone!) You don't know whether to look at them, or look away...especially when you fear that you may look too long, or not have the right expression or something. But, I've heard handicapped people actually make fun of people who don't look at them, "Afraid I'll bite you?" That sort of thing.) And, do you refer to a difference? Or not? I know some people with disabilities who seem to want to talk about it openly and a LOT, while others don't seem to want to refer to it at all. Of course that makes sense, as we are all different in a lot of ways - but it does make it more difficult to know what to do.

Mike and Christie said...

Oh Annie, I know what your a talking about! Sarah does really well with normal questions or kids asking what happened. It is that over the top rudeness that unnerves her.

We too have experience handicapped people be snappy, like "I'll do it myself" when you were really just doing what you would normally do.
Being handicapped does not make a person less sinful. LOL

You are the kindest and sweetest. I would just do what is natural and if they don't like it.... let your kindness flow to somebody else! :)

Mike and Christie said...

We love the Rod and Staff readers with the Millers, but have not read that one. Is this one of those?

astudentinkolkata said...

The range of movements that Sarah (and Erika)can do with her (their) missing limbs, I cannot do with all mine intact! I think the story of your family, particularly Erika's, Sarah's and your son Tim's, shows that it doesn't matter how much you're born outside the spectrum of a 'normal' body, it doesn't matter how much society tells you that you oughtn't be able to dance, jump, play soccer, knit and be a TEACHER! with your 'condition', all that matters is what God wants of you, and your absolute refusal to believe that you can't. I think you and your husband have done a remarkable job ensuring that your children believe in themselves and I guess that shows in how out-of-the-ordinary talented they all are.

My brother has a more invisible form of disability: he is hearing impaired and uses hearing aids. He still gets the occassional staring stranger and he hates it. Like you mentioned, there are types of stares: the genuinely curious, friendly queries that don't hurt and the 'othering' kind of stare which DOES. I guess love and kindness goes a long way on both sides in these interactions!

-K

Brooke said...

"Prudence and the Millers" is one of the Rod and Staff Miller Family Series. We have already read "Wisdom and the Millers," which the kids also liked. Our son kept asking, "How does it happen that every one of my behaviors that we work on, show up the next time we read that book?" It was really amazing how every issue we were working through coincided so perfectly with what the Miller children in the book were experiencing.
"Missionary Stories and the Millers" was too intense for our fear-filled child. We will try it again later.

Tracy said...

It always amazes me how much Sarah and Erika can do with their missing limbs. You have two (actually four) very special little girls.
I dont know if you have been keeping up with the olympics, but their is a South African athlete Oscar Pistorius who is a double amputee and is participating in the main olympics as well as in the paralympics. Truly inspirational.

You Are Still Holy

LinkWithin